OpTic Gaming’s Rise to Esports Fame

OpTic Gaming formed in the beginning of console Esports back in 2006 when the Call of Duty began to pick up steam with the release of Call of Duty 2. Since then, they have become one of the premier Esports organizations praised for their well-oiled management led by owner Hector “H3CZ” Rodriguez. OpTic Gaming grew from a small console fan base into one of the largest, if not the largest, Esports fanbases in the Western region. This growth did not happen overnight, it accumulated through multiple years of hard work from the organization and its players through the Call of Duty scene. The console scene was one of the slower growing scenes as its widely known that a keyboard and mouse was far superior and required more skill than a controller. This reflected in the small prize pools of tournaments and attendance even today compared to other major Esports games. Call of Duty is also not well known for its ranked play or offline functions, but I won’t get into that. From a ragtag group of Call of Duty players to holding multiple first-place trophies and world championships in multiple games, OpTic Gaming is here to take the non-console Esports scene by storm.

Call of Duty is where it all began for OpTic Gaming and that’s where their main fan base is still from. After poor performances in basically every Call of Duty title, the organization picked up, arguably, the four best Call of Duty players in what people now call the best roster in Call of Duty history, after finally bringing home the World Championship in Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare. This, however, was not the organization’s first World Championship. OpTic Gaming is kind of known in the console scene for buying the best rosters from other organizations after contracts expire. Back in 2016, OpTic acquired the best Halo roster in history from CLG after the team’s contract had ended. This team would end up winning the Halo 5 World Championship. It doesn’t stop there.  Same thing happens with their current Gears of War roster. The Gears of War team would dominate the 2016 season and win the World Championship. In the three biggest console Esports, OpTic Gaming went three-for-three in World Championships. After winning E-League season 2, the Counter-Strike roster split and the team fell from where it once stood. After some changes, the organization decided to make an EU super-team consisting of Allu, HS, Magisk, Friberg, and Mixwell. OpTic Gaming has also entered the Dota scene by picking up PPD’s stack, The Dire, for the 2017-2018 season. They have also secured an Overwatch League spot in Houston, where the organization will be moving. There are also rumors that OpTic has made it to the next stage of earning a franchise spot in the NA LCS for League of Legends. Now, this blog might seem like a circle jerk, and I’m not going to lie, it absolutely is. I have been a part of the Green Wall since Modern Warfare 2. I am just excited for the much-deserved recognition OpTic Gaming will gain after picking up rosters in non-console games. The culture of the organization and its fans is something so special that, I dare say, no other organization shares with their fans. We saw this with their recent pick up of their new Dota roster. After it was announced, OpTic fans flooded Dota minor qualifier streams that OpTic was playing in. From an average of five thousand viewers before the announcement, to twenty thousand after the announcement, the organizers had to tell their casters to explain more of the advanced mechanics a new player wouldn’t understand so the OpTic fans could learn the game.

OpTic Gaming’s new exposure into the ever-growing Esports scene will be beneficial for the organization and the games they have rosters in. The Green Wall is loyal and we follow every roster no matter the game, whether we understand what’s going on or not. By having OpTic Gaming competing in your Esport, you will see growth in your player-base and stream.

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